Fort of Rajasthan

The Chittaurgarh Fort

The Chittaurgarh Fort is a living testimony to the bravery of the great Rajput rulers who laid down their life fighting a superior enemy instead of leading a life of submission. The fort is located on a hill that dominates the modern township of Chittor. It is a fine example of the Rajput style of architecture. The fort of Chittor is believed to have been the capital of the Gahlot and Sisodia kings who ruled Mewar from the eighth to the sixteenth century AD.The fort is named after Chittrangad Mauraya. The Sisodia ruler Ajay Pal (AD 1174-1177) improved the fort wall built by the Gahlot king in the ninth century AD

The fort has witnessed three ferocious sieges and each time her defenders, demonstrating true Rajputana pride, fought valiantly against the enemies. The magnificent fort rises 150 m above the surrounding region and runs to an approximate length of 3 km covering an area of 60 acres and peripheral length of 13 km.

Mehrangarh Fort - The Legacy of the Past

Situated on a steep hill, Mehrangarh Fort is one of the largest forts in India. The fort has been a witness to the splendour of a bygone era. The beauty and the grandeur of numerous palaces in the fort narrates a saga of hard sandstones yielding to the chisels of skilled Jodhpuri sculptures. To enter the Mehrangarh fort, seven gates have to be crossed. Some of these gates still bear marks of many a siege that this fort has withstood. Its very hard to imagine how any invader even thought of conquering this fort, which at places has 17 feet thick and 68 feet high walls.

The Mehrangarh Fort encloses many palaces, which are known for their intricate carvings and sprawling courtyards. Moti Mahal or the Pearl Palace has a delicately carved stone screen and treasures the Sringar Chowki, royal throne of Jodhpur. Umaid Villas displays the Rajput miniature paintings and Ajit Villas exhibits musical instruments and the royal costumes. Both these villas are joined by a beautiful mirror room.

Amber Fort

The Amber Fort in Rajasthan built in 1592 by Raja Man Singh, is one of the finest examples of Rajput architecture. Perched high on a barren ridge, it commands extensive views over a deep narrow valley and the wider plains beyond. The building was finally completed in the early18th century when the threat of Mughal domination was receding. Amber was once, the capital of the Mina tribes, believed to be the original inhabitants of this region.

Located up on the hills that surround Jaipur, the fort, sprawled along the Maotha Lake, boasts of a massive complex gateways, courts, stairways and pillared pavilions, and palaces that recall the glory and wealth, of Amber's association with the Mughals. This complex was built by Raja Man Singh, Mirza Raja Jai Singh and Sawai Jai Singh, over a period of about two centuries.

The front courtyard of the complex, is adorned with the magnificent, pillared hall of the Diwan - i - Am, and the two - tiered painted gateway Ganesh Pol. The palace of mirrors, Sheesh Mahal, is of special interest. It has walls inlaid with exquisite mirrors. The Jas Mandir, perched on the upper floor, is a superb amalgam of Mughal and Rajput style of architecture, as is evident from the exquisitely carved Jali screens, and fine mirror and stucco work.