Delhi

Rajpath and India Gate

Flanked by ornamental ponds and lawns, Rajpath is host to the Republic Day Parade. The two secretariat buildings and Rashtrapati Bhawan on the Raisina hills are located on the two sides of this immensely broad road. Previously the Boat Club, besides the Rajpath, was host to many demonstrations and Rallies. India Gate is towards the eastern end of Rajpath.

India Gate is a 42m high stone arch of triumph. It bears the name of the 85,000 Indian Army Soldiers who died in the campaigns of WW1, the North-West Frontiers operations and the 1919 Afghan Fiasco. Below the arch is the memorial to the Unknown Soldier. Green grass lawns and trees surround India Gate.

The Parliament House

Sansad Bhawan or the Parliament house is the supreme law making body in the country. It is the center of power and politicians decide the fate of the Indian Democracy here. Visitors are not allowed inside the house but when the house is in session, visitors may take permission to go inside and watch the proceedings of the house. The parliament consists of three halls- Lok Sabha, Rajya Sabha and the central hall.

Fort and Monuments

Humayun's Tomb

One of the most spectacular Mughal buildings, Humayun's tomb was added to UNESCOís World Heritage List in 1993. Built by Haji Begum, the widow of Humanyun, the second Mughal Emperor, the mausoleum is known to the precursor of world famous Taj Mahal. Built with a cost of one and a half million rupees, the monument heralded the construction of garden-tombs on the Indian subcontinent. Experience the majesty of Humayun's tomb with Hotels of New Delhi. The structure is one of the best examples of Mughal Architecture. Humayun's wife is also buried in the red and white sandstone, black and yellow marble tomb. The entry in the complex is free on Fridays.

Jama Masjid

The largest mosque in India, the Jama or Jami Masjid was built between 1644 and 1658 during the reign of Shah Jahan, the most prolific of the Mughal builders. Originally known as the Masjid-i-Jahanuma, or "mosque commanding view of the world", the mosque is built of colossal proportions and has a courtyard, which can accommodate 25,000 devotees. Made of sandstone and white marble, the mosque has three gateways, two 40m high minarets and four towers.

Lotus Temple - Baha'i Temple in Delhi is often compared to the Sydney Opera House. Located 12km southeast of Connaught Place, has emerged as a top attraction for the tourists. Popularly known as the Lotus Temple, Baha'i Temple is a major feature of Delhi and is well known for its appearance. There is no doubt that in years to come the temple will prove to be a mecca for the visitors. Baha'ism is considered to be a syncretism of the nine great religions of the world and traces its genesis to its prophet Baha'u'llah, born in Persia in the twentieth century.

Old Fort

It is believed that the Pandavas had built their capital, Indraprastha at the place where the old fort stands today. This fort, now in ruins, was the seat for administration for many emperors. The legendary Prithviraj Chauhan ruled from here till he was defeated by Abdali in the battle of Panipat. A new light & sound show is held by the Department of Delhi Tourism every evening. Timings and Tickets are available from the tourist office.

Jantar Mantar

Few minutes walk from Connaught Place is a strange collection of Solomon coloured structures. These were built by Maharaja Jai Singh and are actually an observatory. Though not as large as its compatriot in Jaipur although Jantar Mantar at Delhi also an attraction for the tourists. The astonishing part of these observatories is that they can calculate many astronomical movements very accurately.

Red Fort

Built in Red Sand stone this imposing fort is 3 KMS in perimeter with the height of the wall varying from 18 to 30 meters at places. When the Red fort was being built Yamuna used to flow on its one sides and there were deep moats on the other. Today Yamuna flows almost a kilometer away from the fort and the moats has dried up. In the evening, the Delhi Tourism organizes a light and sound show, which narrates the history of Delhi in context of the Red Fort.

Qutub Minar

In 1199, Qutubuddin raised the Qutub Minar either as a victory tower or as a minaret to the adjacent mosque. At a height of 72.5 meters, it is still the highest and one of the finest stone towers in India. It is one of the finest Islamic structures ever raised and Delhi's recognized landmark. The Sultanís successor and son-in-law, Iltutmish, completed it. The tomb of Iltutmish, which he himself built in 1235, is nearby; its interiors are profusely decorated with calligraphy, though the dome has collapsed.